I was inspired to write this post by a segment that was on TV Saturday morning.  The segment was a behind the scenes look at the University of South Carolina Football program.  As I was flipping through the channels, I happened to see some weightroom footage that forced me to stay on the channel for more than a few minutes.

During the segment, Head Football Coach Steve Spurrier was shown working out.  In the segment, he mentioned that he works out 5-6 times per week.   He also talked about how important it was for him to get his workouts in.  At the age of 67, the fact that Coach Spurrier gets in 5-6 workouts per week is pretty impressive.  They did show him performing exercises such as rear delt flyes and dumbbell curls while also showing him walk on the treadmill and ride a bike.  Who cares?  The fact that he is making that kind of commitment at his age is very impressive.

What I was also really impressed with was how important he thinks exercising is not only for himself, but for every coach in the profession.  Coach Spurrier talked about how when he speaks to other coaches at clinics, he preaches the importance of exercise and how coaches shouldn’t be overweight while coaching their kids.  He encourages overweight coaches to “Get on the treadmill”.

I agree with coach Spurrier not only from a health prospective, but also from a standpoint of being able to coach.  I think a coach needs to be able to demonstrate proper form and execution.  In the case of a football coach, maybe that is demonstrating what a player needs to do on a specific play?

In the case of the Strength and Conditioning Coach, we are professionals on the subject of exercise; specifically strength and conditioning.  So, Strength and Conditioning Coaches need to be able to demonstrate proper form in exercises- not only in the weightroom, but also on the field demonstrating agility, acceleration, and plyometric drills.

I’m not saying that you need to be as strong or as fast as your athletes.  However, you should be lean, strong, and in condition.  Your athletes are going to respect you more if you are able to “Look the part” and be able to do what they do even if it is slower.  Be fit enough to coach.

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One Response to “Lesson From the Old Ball Coach”

  1. [...] always work against you (or why gym class might not be all it’s cracked up to be) Lesson From the Old Ball Coach Brains Plus Brawn Advice for Aspiring Grad Students and Strength [...]

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