Jul 272015
 

It’s been a long time since my last post to this site.  For those who know me, you know that I am in the process of a change within my career.  As  I make the transition from one coast to the other, I wanted to revisit and update the blog with something current.

A big reason why I haven’t been posting as consistently as I would like to is because I’ve been working on something else when time permits.  One of my goals has always been to write a book on training for hockey.  Well, it is now starting to become a reality. I also want to clean the dust off this blog and start posting again.

Total Hockey Training is due to be released by Human Kinetics in February 2016.  To say that I am excited is an understatement.  I really enjoy the grind of writing and re-writing as we go along until the finish. It will be available both as paperback and e-book.

Apr 012015
 

I wanted to share a post that was written by my friend/mentor Mike Boyle on his blog StrengthCoachblog.com.  Mike has been posting really good content in regards to his thoughts against year-round specialization in youth sports.  I think it’s important to help spread the message all over North America- including here in Southern California.

It just seems that the more that I read what Mike has been sharing along with the fact that I continually speak to professional players about what additional sports they played as youths- the more I am convinced.  A multi-sport approach as a kid is beneficial in the long run when/if they decide to specialize on 1 sport.  For the record, I have spoken to only a few hockey players who didn’t play any other sports. Most “put the bag away” at the end of their hockey seasons.

Personally, in the past I have been guilty of putting my oldest son through the the concept of year-round hockey.  Whether it was spring selects or in-house hockey, more games were being played after a 7-month season.  (Yes- 7 months at age 8).  This spring/summer, after a few weeks off, he will be playing lacrosse while also still skating 1-2 times per week in non-competitive situations and competing in 2 weekend tournaments in May. Probably not a complete off-season, but a drastic change from the past.

Check out Mike’s article here- Be Careful With Advice from Armchair Experts

Oct 032014
 

I hope everyone is doing great!  As we enter October, hockey season is in pre-season mode or in some cases; in-season mode is already taking place.  Either way, you got to love this time of year.

Here at HockeySC.com, we have had some really good content updates since my last post:

Articles:

Shoulder Medial Rotation by Darryl Nelson

Videos:

Partner Pro Agility by myself

Hip Internal Rotation with Reach by Darryl Nelson

On the forum, we have had some good discussions ongoing such as a discussion on training 8-10 year olds and some of the recent articles written about today’s off-season training done by some of today’s NHL players.  What is great about the forum is that there are always good questions and discussions about all different kinds of topics in regards to performance training for hockey.  Make sure you check out the forum when you log on.

Remember, if you are not a current member, you can try us out for $1 for 7 days.   If you don’t like it, you can cancel during that time.

Thanks!

Aug 222014
 

It’s been a while since an update on HockeySC.com.  I hope everyone is enjoying the last few weeks/days of your off-season.  Recently, we have had some excellent content additions:

Articles:

Teaching Hockey Players How to Run by Max Prokopy

Anterior Glide of the Humerus by Darryl Nelson

Why I Never Played in the NHL, and How it Made Me Better by Brian Sipotz

Thoughts on the Kettlebell Swing by myself

Videos:

Kettlebell Kneeling to Standing by Darryl Nelson

U-Mass Lowell Hockey Off-Season by Devan McConnell

Rotational Heiden Medicine Ball Throw by Darryl Nelson

Programming:

Fall Training Program by Darryl Nelson

 

The forum has had some interesting topics such as the NHL combine and Trap Bar Deadlifts.

If you aren’t currently a member, feel free to try us for $1 for 7 days.

Thanks!

Jan 022013
 

I like to write a post at the beginning of every year about goal setting. Why? Because I think goal setting works.   Brian Tracy, a self-improvement expert, talks about the power of setting in goals in many of his books including Goals!: How to Get Everything You Want — Faster Than You Ever Thought Possible.  His advice is simple and it is not that hard to do.

Tracy says to write down 10 specific goals every day in the present tense like you have already accomplished them.  For example, “I weigh 185 pounds” vs. “I will lose weight”.  Write your 10 goals down every day for 30 days straight.  When you write down your goals, then come up with a plan for each of them to be accomplished, then take action, you will have a really good chance of completing them.  At the end of the 30 days, you will be amazed and you will also note the positive changes in your life.

Although it may sound a little cheesy and far-fetched, I really believe in this method and it only takes 5 minutes per day.

Here is my post from last year- Goal Setting.

Dec 312012
 

2012 was a good year at SeanSkahan.com.  I made an effort to improve my content by focusing on the quality of my writing.  Although I think I can improve greatly, I am happy with how far I have come since I started this site.

I was able to increase the number of views to the site by 35% from 2011.  Not too bad, but I can still try to improve the total number.

All being said I thank you very much for stopping by.  I hope to continue to post more frequently with better content in 2013.

Here are the top 5 most read posts of 2012:

5- Lesson From the Old Ball Coach

4- Re-Visiting the FMS in the Team Sport Setting

3- Alternatives for the Hang Clean

2- Improving Shoulder Mobility

1- 5 Exercises That Hockey Players Should be Performing in the Weight Room

Dec 272012
 

Former Los Angeles Lakers head coach Pat Riley has a quote in his book The Winner Within: A Life Plan for Team Players, “If you’re not getting better, you are getting worse”.  I love this quote because I believe it’s true. I always want to see myself as a beginner in the Strength and Conditioning/Sports Performance profession.  Honestly, there is so much that I don’t know.  Which has just dawned on me that I think this is why I am not the biggest fan of some of the internet gurus who-  A- really aren’t coaching anyone and B- really haven’t been doing this for a long time.

2012 was another good year that brought about some life learning experiences both personally and professionally.  Here are 3 things among others that really stood out:

1-  I really enjoy coaching on the floor in the weight room and on the field/ice.  Professionally, this is what I love doing.  Interacting and coaching my athletes while they train is what I am passionate about.    This is what keeps me going.  When something is taken away from you for reasons way beyond your control, you realize how much you love to doing it.  Hopefully, I’m back to doing it soon.

2-  The diaphragm is a really important muscle to ensure that is functioning properly.  While I am still in the infant stages (no pun intended) of learning about its roles in breathing and in spinal stabilization, the reality is that I really didn’t give it the time of day up until a year or two ago.

The diaphragm is an important muscle in function because of its importance in creating deep abdominal pressure (in conjunction with other muscles including the pelvic floor and other abdominals) prior to movement of the upper and/or lower body limb(s) in function.  From an injury prevention perspective, I think this a huge area of importance because if there is insufficient intra-abdominal pressure, dysfunction can easily occur in a part of the chain of events that occur in movemdddddent.  Maybe I’m wrong, but I do know that I will learn more about this.  Thanks to my learning about breathing and my recent attendance at the DNS-A course, this has been brought to my attention and will soon be part of my daily coaching strategies.

3-  I really like USA Hockey’s long-term American Development Model which is I am pretty sure is going to be instituted at the mite level next year in Southern California.  One of the main components of this model at the mite level is that kids will be playing cross-ice games instead of full ice.

What I have learned is while that I agree with the change overall, I am not sure that I agree with it when it comes to my own son.  Please let me explain.  In his situation, he is now playing in travel mite full-ice game hockey at the age of 6.  Prior to this season, he played cross-ice mini games when he was 4 and then played full-ice In-House at age 5.  All of the time however has been spent practicing in mostly station-based drills and cross-ice mini games.  My question is, does he then spend the next 2 years (mites are ages 8 and under) playing cross-ice while he is now capable of playing full ice because he is as big, if not bigger than most of the kids in the mite age group while also being an average- above average skater?  Would this take him backwards as I feel that he can play full ice? Maybe in my eyes, his progression is going good, however he could benefit from the small area games to develop his skills.  I’m not sure, but I’m sure there will be some other kids with same questions.

Dec 102012
 

As many of you know, I find myself with lots of free-time due to circumstances WAY beyond my control.  As a result, I find myself trying to utilize this time the best way that I possibly can.  Whether it is reading articles or books, watching training DVDs, writing blog posts (such as this) and an e-book, or visiting other Strength and Conditioning Coaches/Trainers, I am trying to use this time to get better.  Of course, I would rather be doing my day job and trying to find the extra time to squeeze this stuff in.

On a recent shopping trip to Costco, I picked up the book No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden (not the authors real name).  It may be one of  the biggest books (311 pages) that I have finished in a 2-day time frame.  I couldn’t put it down.

The book is a Navy SEAL’s autobiography that also contains what happened during the planning and accomplished mission of taking down Osama Bin Laden.

I have so much respect for Navy SEALS.  Why?   They are the last people on earth that I would want to piss off.  Which makes me feel safer knowing that these guys are the ones carrying out missions like the one talked about in the book.  Also, I think SEALS are the ultimate athletes.  When you look at what they are tested in both physically and mentally, no one in the whole world is as tough as these guys.  From the time that they decide to become a SEAL through all of their boot camps which includes the “Hell week” in which they sleep for 4 hours total during an entire week, these guys are the cream of the crop.  It is no wonder why the drop out rate is so high.  From a training perspective, what is really impressive about these men is that they must be able to always complete their physical assessments even after they officially become SEALS.  They are also pretty much on call 24-7.  They must be ready to go at any time.  There is no set schedule as to when they are on missions.

What was also impressive in the book was the attention to detail that these men have in the planning process for any mission that they set out to accomplish.  It is all scripted right down to packing their gear properly and rehearsing the missions over and over again.  This really sounds familiar when you think of the deliberate practice concept and why successful coaches teach their athletes about the importance of the smallest of details.  Coach Wooden teaching his players how to put their socks on properly comes to mind.

Like the great book Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10, another SEAL autobiography, there is so much from this book and the whole Navy SEAL culture that can apply to coaching and being a member of a team.

Here is a quote that I really like from the book:

“We are not superheroes, but we all share a common bond in serving something greater than ourselves.  It is a brotherhood that ties us together, and that bond is what allows us to willingly walk into harm’s way together.”

Obviously, I really liked the book and was really surprised that I crushed it 2 days.  Check it out here

Dec 032012
 

I realize that I am a week late for Cyber Monday.  However, I just wanted to let everyone know that I lowered the price of my DVD’s- Kettlebell Lifting For Hockey and Slideboard Training For Hockey by 20%.

I thought that the title of the post was appropriate because I guess I would consider myself to be a beginner still in the whole information product marketing world.  I’ve always seen myself as a Strength and Conditioning Coach who made the DVDs because I believe in the content and I strongly believe that it can help any hockey player and/or coach.  However, the reality is that not that many people are talking about them on-line.  I now get the power of marketing and the impact of more people talking about your products.  All I can do is appreciate the learning experience that this has provided me with.

I do promise to get the word out more when I do complete my book which is now 40,000 words and 150 pages deep.  I find myself at the stage where I am updating more of the content as I learn more.

Anyways, for now, Kettlebell Lifting For Hockey and Slideboard Training For Hockey are both for sale here.

Here are a couple of clips from the DVD’s:

Thanks!